The Ultimate Guide to Name Change in Nevada

Nevada name change after marriage, divorce, or court petition

Going through a legal name change in Nevada might sound hard, but it's much easier than you'd think. This page will help you navigate the different ways to legally change your name. Whether through marriage, divorce, or district court petition.

How do I change my name after marriage?

Name change after marriage in Nevada is the most frequent kind. It's the core focus of our website and online service. So it makes sense to start here.

Nevada's many marriage name change options
Nevada's lavish name change smorgasbord is a horn of plenty.

It's common for married people to change their name. The laws of Nevada make it easy, granting this power to every newlywed. No court order required.

Whether you're a wife planning to take your husband's name (or vice versa) or a same-sex couple, Nevada allows this using your marriage certificate.

Your options are massive. Transform your middle or last, or even both together. Don't worry, we'll show you every possible new name sequence and combination.

Can I demo my name change options?

It's often easier to see your new married name spelled out than cobbled together from mundane laws. We created the Nevada name change visualizer for just this reason.

Nevada name change visualizer tool
Name change without having to think too hard.

Enter your and your spouse's current name details below (we don't log this), then this article will update on-the-fly, personalized to your preference. Nifty!

Enter your name
Enter your spouse's name

Note: Changes entered above will appear in the middle name table and last name table, lower on this page.

Can I change my middle name?

Switching out your middle name is optional. The following six choices are available when applying for your Nevada marriage license.

Warning: Be sure your ID matches what you put on your forms.

Option 1—the obvious—replace your middle name with your maiden name. This is a popular way to keep your heritage intact while honoring your spouse.

Option 2—hat tip—replace your middle name with your spouse's current or birth surname. A unique approach of inclusion while giving up little.

Option 3—complete dominance—hyphenate your middle name with your current or birth surname. Sacrifice nothing.

Option 4—sorta compromise—hyphenate your middle name with your spouse's current or birth surname. Hey, they're still in the mix.

Option 5—abandon ship—wipe out your middle name, slide in your spouse's middle, then tack on their current or birth surname with a hyphen. Adiós, muchachos.

Option 6—flanking maneuver—trash your middle name, slip in your spouse's middle, then rope in your (yes, your) current or birth surname with a hyphen. Crafty.

Option Zero—impossible honorable mentions—while you've got many middle name change avenues, several paths are off-limits. For example, you can't:

  • Drop it outright (replace it with nothing)
  • Change its spelling
  • Use your middle initial
  • Combine names with a space (double-barrel)
  • Combine names without a space (make them flush)
  • Backtrack to an in-betweener name change (e.g., name change 2 of 3)

As promised, here's a visualization of your middle name change options.

Middle name Description
Anne Unchanged
King Birthname
Reed Spouse's surname
Ward Spouse's birthname
AnneCook Add your surname
AnneKing Add your birthname
AnneReed Add spouse's surname
AnneWard Add spouse's birthname
OtisReed Spouse's middle & surname
OtisWard Spouse's middle & birthname
OtisCook Spouse's middle & your surname
OtisKing Spouse's middle & your birthname

Note: When hyphenating, it doesn't matter who goes first or last.

Can I change my last name?

Of course you can change your last name after marriage. The choices are as generous as your middle selections. Let's explore your opportunities.

1. Return to your maiden name

Peter Allen: 'Everything old is new again'
Bring your old handle back to glory.

Thought your only choice was taking your spouse's name or hyphenating? Oh, no. Go retro. Revert to your maiden name. Guys too.

2. Take your spouse's surname

Traditional name change: don't rock the boat
Keep it old school, take your better half's name as-is.

Embrace the traditional route by taking your spouse's last name as your own. Curveball: you could even take their last name at birth, if different.

3. Hyphenate names (current and birth)

Hyphenate your names

This next one's a doozy. You can hyphenate any combination of last names. Even going back to the beginning.

Confused? Try this. Draw four squares on a sheet of paper. Write your current surname in one box. The one you held at birth in another. Do likewise for your spouse.

Nevada hyphenation combos
Download this image as a printable PDF hyphenation template.

You can create hyphenated variations using any two squares. Even if both belong to you. Yes, you can ride solo. Whichever comes first or last matters none.

Warning: You can't join names without a hyphen. For instance, you can't use a space. Petition the court if this doesn't work for you.

Here's a demonstration of your last name change options.

Last name Description
Cook Unchanged
King Birthname
Reed Spouse's surname
Ward Spouse's birthname
CookKing Add your birthname
CookReed Add spouse's surname
CookWard Add spouse's birthname
KingWard Hyphenate both birthnames

Note: Hyphenation order is your choice to make.

Can I change my first name too?

You can't change your first name through marriage. That requires a name change petition. What's written on your marriage documents must match your proof of identity.

How do I apply for a Nevada marriage license?

Before getting married in Nevada, apply for a marriage license, then change your name afterward. Let's discuss what that entails.

Marriage license precedes name change
Marriage license first, name changes last.

You can apply for a marriage license at any Nevada county clerk's office. It costs $60 to $77. There's no blood test or waiting period. Your license will expire after one year.

Yearning for a Reno or Las Vegas wedding? The Clark County Clerk and Washoe County Clerk offices are open from 8am to midnight. Other counties close at 5pm.

Commercial wedding chapels sell licenses too, but you must get married in their county. Otherwise, you can marry anywhere in Nevada.

Warning: Limited or 24-hour commercial wedding chapels may only sell marriage licenses when their own county's clerk's office closes for the day.

By the way, you can't marry your first cousin, get married by proxy, or enter into a common law marriage in Nevada.

Bring one identification card

Bring proof of ID when applying

Bring photo ID showing your age, such as a driver's license, passport, military ID, or Real ID card. If divorced or widowed, bring proof of divorce or your spouse's death certificate.

Documents should match your name change intentions. For instance, if birth names are in the mix, yet your ID doesn't show that, bring proof that does.

Choose your new name on the application

Choose your new name when applying
Designate your preferred married name when applying.

You must spell out your new name on the marriage application. Don't get caught flatfooted like a deer in the headlights, telling the county clerk, "Oh, I didn't know." They can't help you. Decide early or wallow in regret later.

Getting married doesn't automatically change the name on your social security card, driver's license, or passport. You must notify the Social Security Administration (SSA), NV DMV, and passport acceptance facility.

Marriage license to name change

How do you go from a Nevada marriage license to changing your name? Let's discuss the sequence of events and turnaround times.

Marriage name change timeline
License, ceremony, and certified marriage certificates first, social security office last.

Whoever officiates your wedding must return your license to the county recorder's (not clerk's) office within 10 days after your ceremony.

Afterward, order a certified copy of your marriage certificate from the county recorder to legally change the name on your social security card, driver's license, passport, etc.

Note: Buy certified copies of your marriage certificate in advance when applying for a marriage license. You'll automatically get them by mail.

How do I change my name after divorce?

Changing your name after a divorce in Nevada is easy. You'll be in court to finalize other legal matters, so ask the judge for a change of name too.

Free as a bird, old name after divorce
Divorce let's you get your name changed back to any prior legal name.

When the court grants your divorce, they may allow you to return to a prior name. This includes any transition between birth and the present day.

Use a certified copy of your divorce decree as your legal name change document when notifying government agencies and third parties.

If your decree is missing your name change, you forgot to ask for it, or you've changed your mind, contact the courthouse to seek an amendment.

Ask the judge to restore your maiden name
Change your name by court petition if hopeless via divorce.

A separate name change petition must be filed if the court denies your amendment. If you're not a Nevada resident, file in your own jurisdiction.

How do I petition for a name change in Nevada?

Petition to change your name through a Nevada district court if you can't do it through marriage or divorce. You can complete the adult name change process yourself (paperwork to court hearing) without hiring a family law attorney.

Court petitioned name change
A court petition is the Swiss Army knife of legal name changes.

Note: If you're getting married and planning to change your name through court petition, consider just the latter to avoid unnecessary double name changes.

Petition for change of name

File a petition for adult name change with your resident county clerk of court. Step 1 is the Civil Cover Sheet asking your name and DOB. Step 2 is the Petition for Change of Name.

Explain the reasons for pursuing a legal change of name on your paperwork. Liking the way it sounds is a valid reason. Evading debt, taxes or arrest is a poor rationale.

You must swear under penalty of perjury that your name change isn't for fraudulent purposes. Newspaper notice of your petition helps weed out bad actors before the hearing.

The filing fee to change your name in Nevada costs between $200 and $300, paid with cash, check, credit card, or money order. Ask for a waiver if you can't afford the filing fee.

Note: If you plan to cite a gender change on your birth certificate or other documents, ask the court to change your gender marker in your petition.

Getting fingerprinted

Getting fingerprinted
Use a Nevada law enforcement or private fingerprint service.

Give the court a copy of your fingerprints if you have prior felony convictions. Tell the truth or they'll dismiss your case. It costs $20 to get fingerprinted at most Department of Public Safety sites, including your local police department.

Publish the notice of your legal name change

Newspaper name change publication
District court can waive the publication requirement for safety reasons.

Your notice of petition for a name change must be published in your local county newspaper at least once. There are two exceptions to this rule:

  • You're changing your name for gender identity purposes.
  • The court has firm proof that publication would endanger your safety.

Once publication is complete, the newspaper will either send the Affidavit of Publication to district court or ask you (the petitioner) to get it and register yourself.

Submit the name change order to a judge

Judge's name change order
Petition, publication, and hearing done. Your signed order comes last.

A judge can't sign your name change order until 10 days after newspaper publication of your Notice of Petition for Change of Name. Enough time for someone to object to your case.

The court approves most legal name changes without a hearing, so long as you file a Request for Summary Disposition & Declaration in Support when opening your case.

Once the judge signs your court order, the clerk of court will either call you to pick it up or mail it out. Get certified copies to change your name with government agencies.

Finally change your name on all documents

Once you've got your marriage certificate, divorce decree, or court order, you're ready to finish the name change process across federal and state agencies.

My new ID
Make your name change official by updating government ID.

How do I update my social security card?

Use Form SS-5 along with your name change document to change the name on your social security card. Either mail it or visit your nearest Social Security Administration office. Your new card will arrive by mail within two weeks. Your social security number will stay the same.

Note: Your name change document can serve as ID if it occurred within the past two years. Otherwise, use your driver's license, state ID, or passport.

How do I update my driver's license or Real ID?

Update your social security card before your driver's license. Space them out at least 48 hours. Visit the DMV in person. Bring proof of name change and identification. For Real ID, bring documents proving Nevada residence.

Note: You can change your gender marker to M, F, or X without showing a court order or new birth certificate.

Nevada name change complete

Nevada name change complete

The big part of your legal name change is complete. Time to update everything else: credit cards, online and social media accounts, doctor's offices, and car, health, and life insurance.

Check your mail pile and email inbox for more ideas. Keep certified copies of your name change documents safe. Nongovernment entities can use photocopies.

Do you plan to change your name?

Our online name change kit makes it easy.

Get Started

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